Sharon Lanen Coskren - Leading Edge Real Estate



Posted by Sharon Lanen Coskren on 8/17/2018

No income verification mortgage loans sound like a great idea. Also known as stated loans, these are easier to obtain than traditional mortgages. You wonít have to go through endless amounts of paperwork that traditional mortgages require. Think again. These types of loans are high risk and borrowers may have a hard time paying these loans back. Many lenders have removed these kinds of loans from their list of options. In certain circumstances, these loans can work for you, but you have to do your homework. 


Where Can You Get A Stated Loan?


Some lenders still provide these stated loans with no verification process required. Unlike earlier times, these loans are now pretty difficult to obtain. Typically, this type of mortgage is geared towards the self-employed and requires a large down payment. Also, the borrower must have a very good credit score to be considered for the loan. 


Are Stated Loans Unaffordable?


Since these loans come at very high interest rates, they are often seen as unaffordable due to the high monthly payment. Stated loans can have double the interest rate of what the current available mortgage rates are. However, if you donít have many options, or are in a hurry to get a home and have money in the bank, it could work well for you.  


Could A No Income Verification Loan Be Right For You? 


If you really want a home loan, the first step is to be truly honest about your income. If you find a beautiful home and know that itís out of your price range, you could risk defaulting on the loan. 


To truly understand what you can afford, youíll need to figure out all of your monthly expenses including taxes, mortgage insurance, phone bills and grocery bills. This will give you a full picture of your finances. Once you look at all of these factors, you may find that it does make the most sense for you to get a no income verification loan. 


Deciding On The Type Of Loan Youíll Get


If you find that you need a lower monthly payment, it may make more sense for you to go after a traditional home loan. If youíre self-employed and know that your options are limited, a stated loan certainly is an option for you, youíll just need to understand the risks of the entire process. Youíll also need to have a bunch of documents ready for the lender once you decide to go for the home loan. You can compare the costs of a no income verification loan to a traditional mortgage. Then, you can ask your lender what theyíll need from you in order to verify everything for the traditional mortgage. Any good broker can help you through your decision-making process. Youíll want to be well informed and compare all of the programs along with their fees. You should get recommendations on a lender who has the knowledge and experience to help you find the home loan thatís right for you.




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Posted by Sharon Lanen Coskren on 9/29/2017

Thereís so much to consider when to comes to buying a new home. The first issue is that of your finances. You need to make sure that youíre preparing financially for the home search, and not just making your list of ďwantsĒ for a new home. Itís an exciting time when youíre purchasing your first home, but donít let the excitement overtake your responsibility. Hereís some tips to keep you on the financial straight and narrow path when preparing to buy a home: Be Mindful Of Your Credit Score Thereís many factors that can affect your credit score. Applying for new credit cards is one of those factors. Your credit score will drop a few points every time you have a new credit inquiry or open a new account. If you do get approved for new credit, lenders may have concerns that youíll spend up maxing out your new approved credit limit on that account and possibly default on your loan. Closing credit accounts is another factor that greatly affects your credit score. You may think that closing unused accounts is a good idea to help get yourself financially ready for becoming a homeowner. This isnít true. Closing accounts lowers your amount of overall available credit. This means that your debt-to-credit ratio is larger. This lowers your overall credit score. You can certainly make these smart financial changes after you close on your new home. Keep Records When you move your money around, make sure you have records of it. Your lender will want to know about any unusual deposits and withdrawals. Youíll need to prove where your money comes from. All of the cash that youíll be using for your home purchase should be in one account before you apply for a mortgage. Keep Up With Your Bills Donít increase your debt. This will have an affect on the very important debt-to-income ratio which is one of the most vital aspects of loan approval. Also, be sure that you donít skip your payments on bills. Your history of payments is incredibly important as well. Be sure that you continue to make full, on-time payments on all of your bills. Keep Your Job Even though a new job could mean a raise, or a better situation for you and your family, it could delay you in getting a mortgage. Youíll need to have your employment verified along with pay stubs to prove your source of income. Lenders like to see a longer employment history. Keep Saving The biggest up front costs in buying a home is that of closing costs and the down payment. Those must be paid at the time of closing. Lenders may even verify that your savings is on hand. Keep saving steadily and be sure to keep your savings in place.





Posted by Sharon Lanen Coskren on 4/21/2017

Houses located in emerging or progressive areas under development could yield a rewarding financial return. These houses could also yield social rewards. During the early years of development, you might have to endure construction sites and noise. Several months or a year or two might pass before houses in the community fill with neighbors, people who may quickly become among your closest friends.

Hidden costs of buying a house

A place to call your own, great neighbors and a community that is growing and increasing your house's value can make buying a house a solid financial and personal decision. To truly be advantageous, you need to know everything that you're taking on when you buy a house.

The principal is the largest part of your mortgage. It's also the part of owning a house that you might pay the most attention to. What you don't want to do is make the mortgage principal the only part of the owning a house that you focus on. In addition to the principal, when you buy a house, you will likely have to pay expenses like those listed below:

  • Loan interest - Mortgages with adjustable rate interest can start low, but may not stay that way. A variable rate mortgage and a tracker mortgage are other types of mortgages that could increase should interest rates hike. A fixed rate might be higher, depending on when you buy a house, but a fixed rate mortgage could keep your monthly output steady.
  • Closing costs - Items included in closing costs are the first month's homeowners association fees, prepaid interest and points.The more points that you pay upfront, the more you could lower your monthly mortgage installments.
  • Mortgage insurance - Depending on the lender,you may have to pay mortgage insurance that covers 10% or more of your total mortgage. A way around the insurance or a way to lower the insurance is to invest more in your down payment.
  • Homeowners insurance - Mortgage insurance and homeowners insurance are different. Mortgage insurance protects the lender.Homeowners insurance protects you and the lender.
  • Homeowners association fees - Although homeowners association fees might be included in your closing costs, you will generally have to make these payments monthly. Don't overlook homeowners association fees and rules when you start looking for a house.
  • Property taxes - The value of your property, the age of your home and the jurisdiction that your house is located in impact property taxes.
  • Mortgage broker or realtor fees and commissions - These fees are higher in some parts of the country.
  • Home inspection - Factor in the costs of getting a thorough home inspection.
  • Home appraisal - You'll also need to get your house appraised to realize the actual value of the property.

Because there are additional costs that you must generally be responsible for after you buy a house, shop for property that you can easily afford. In other words, don't buy a house that leaves you with only $100 or less left each month after you pay your mortgage. After all, there are other costs involved in owning a house that you will surface during and after closing.




Tags: Mortgage  
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Sharon Lanen Coskren