Sharon Lanen Coskren - Leading Edge Real Estate



Posted by Sharon Lanen Coskren on 4/6/2018

Ready to choose a home inspector before you finalize a house purchase? Ultimately, there are many key questions you'll want to ask your home inspector to ensure he or she has what it takes to assess a house, including:

1. What are your qualifications?

Choosing a home inspector who understands the ins and outs of reviewing a property is paramount. Thus, you'll want to evaluate a candidate's credentials closely to guarantee he or she knows how to inspect all aspects of a residence.

Find out about a home inspector's skills and background. By doing so, you can understand how this professional has approached home inspections in the past.

Also, retrieve copies of a home inspector's past house evaluations and find out if he or she is a member of national or state home inspector associations. Evaluating a home inspector's past reports will provide you with an example of what to expect from this professional during your home assessment. Meanwhile, a home inspector who is a member of a national or state home inspector association likely possesses training and certifications that may help him or her stand out from other home inspectors in your area.

2. Can you provide references?

Were past clients satisfied or dissatisfied with a home inspector? Ask a home inspector to provide references, and you'll be able to learn about past clients' experiences in no time at all.

Don't forget to check out client reviews on Yelp, Angie's List and other professional review websites too. This will enable you to better understand if a particular home inspector is the right professional to assess your residence.

3. Do you possess errors and omissions insurance?

In some instances, a home inspector may make mistakes during a house assessment that he or she probably should have noticed. If a home inspector possesses errors and omissions insurance, however, you may be protected in this scenario.

Errors and omissions insurance offers professional liability coverage for home inspectors. This means a home inspector who holds errors and omissions insurance will be able to cover the costs associated with an error that you feel he or she should have caught during a house inspection.

Be on the lookout for a home inspector who will require you to sign a waiver limiting his or her liability as well. If a home inspector requires a waiver, you may be held responsible for any home problems that this professional misses during a house assessment.

Searching for a home inspector can be tricky, especially if you're trying to navigate a complex homebuying process. But if you spend some time reviewing a broad array of home inspectors, you should have no trouble finding a home inspector who can meet or exceed your expectations.

Don't forget to rely on your real estate agent for support as you search for a qualified home inspector. Your real estate agent may be able to recommend home inspectors in your area and help take the guesswork out of discovering the ideal home inspector so you can finalize your house purchase.





Posted by Sharon Lanen Coskren on 4/22/2016

A home is a very big purchase in your life and one of the most important things you can do before you buy your new home. It can be difficult to find a qualified home inspector. You will want to make sure to do your homework before paying for a home inspection. Here are some tips to help you get on the right track and finding the right home inspector. Ask for opinions. Ask your friends and your real estate agent who they recommend who have had an inspection recently. You can also ask the inspector for references. Word of mouth is always a great way to find a reliable professional. Check with your lender Some lenders or loan types require a certain type of inspection. You will want to make sure your inspector qualifies and you obtain the necessary type of inspection. Ask what the inspection covers No two home inspections are the same so you will want to be sure to know what you are paying for. Ask questions like:

  • What systems are covered in the home inspection?
  • Are there some services that require an extra fee?
  • Ask for an example or outline of the inspection report.
  • Ask for a resume or background questions
  • Where was the inspector trained?
  • Does he or she attend continuing education classes?
  • Does the inspector belong to a professional organization? If so, what are the requirements for membership? Entry should require more than just an application fee.
  • Does the inspector carry Errors & Omissions insurance? This type of malpractice insurance may come in handy if the inspector overlooks a major problem.
  • At the inspection A home inspection is not only a time to find the potential pitfalls it can also be a time to learn about your new home. Make sure to attend the inspection yourself. Witnessing problems first-hand will give you a better grasp of the home.   .







    Sharon Lanen Coskren