Sharon Lanen Coskren - Leading Edge Real Estate



Posted by Sharon Lanen Coskren on 7/20/2018

You already know that closing costs on a home can come at a hefty price. There are a few ways that you can actually cut down on the amount of closing costs that you may have on a home. 


Compare The Costs


You have the right to shop around for a lender who offers the lowest closing costs. You can even ask your lender to match the closing costs of another lender that may have them for a lower fee. Certain fees that are included in the closing are negotiable and flexible. You’re allowed to shop around for inspections, title searches, surveys, and the like. There’s nothing that says you have to go with the company recommended by your lender for each. There should be a list of services that is included in the closing costs on your estimate that you receive form the lender.


Question What Each Fee Covers


When you get the loan estimate, don’t just accept it. Take a look at each item and inquire what the fee includes. See why each item costs as much as it does. Be on the lookout for fees with similar names. The lender could be double charging you without your knowledge. It’s always good to be informed especially where large investments are involved.        


 

Negotiate


You have the right to negotiate with your lender on the closing costs. You can ask for obscure and unnecessary costs to be taken off from the closing. Getting the closing disclosure form as soon as you can will also help you to settle any discrepancies before it’s too late. 


Ask The Seller


Some sellers will even be willing to sweeten the deal for you by either lowering the sale price of the home or covering some or all of the closing costs. Depending on the market, you may be able to get the seller to help reduce your burden of the closing costs. 


If You’re Refinancing 


Every time that you refinance your home, you’ll need to pay closing costs. There are a couple of ways that you can save in this situation. One is to waive the appraisal altogether. If the home has recently been appraised, you may be able to waive the appraisal completely. You can also request an automatic appraisal rather than a full appraisal in order to save some money.

The other option that you have when refinancing to save money is to save on the title insurance. You can ask for what’s called a re-issue date, which is a less expensive rate for the title insurance for refinancers.


Closing costs are a part of the process when you buy a home. If you’re careful, you might be able to save some money on these mandatory fees.




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Posted by Sharon Lanen Coskren on 6/22/2018

From the time an offer is made on a property, and the deal is done, you may face quite a few challenges. Whether you’re buying or selling a home, the process can be dizzying. There are a lot of things that go on from the time an offer is accepted, and the closing table is reached. The entire process of home buying and selling is designed with built-in protections to help both buyers and sellers avoid feeling a lot of regrets. Below, you’ll find some familiar situations in the buying and selling process, and what’s available to help you avoid disappointment.


Once An Offer Is Accepted, Is It Binding? 


If you were overzealous to accept an offer on the home you’re selling and wish you had looked at others before making a decision, you’re not out of luck. Once you’re under contract, you’re obligated to sell to a buyer. The reason you may want to look at other offers is that it doesn’t hurt to have a “backup” buyer. If something falls through with the first buyer, the second buyer in line becomes automatically under contract. While you may not necessarily sell for more, in this case, there’s a sure way available to help you sell your home fast. 


The Buyer Doesn’t Have The Financing They Thought They Did


If a buyer’s financial backing falls through or if the buyer is unable to get financing by the closing date, as a seller, you can walk away. Any financial changes to the contract that would impact you as a seller including a change in the type of loan, downpayment amount, or any variation from the contract terms allow the seller to end the contract unscathed. 


Something Wasn’t Disclosed About The Property


Not everything is required to be disclosed by a seller. It all depends upon the rules within the state where you are buying. Understand what’s required to be revealed. If you feel uncomfortable with something, you can inquire about it, or add a contingency to have the problem addressed. Things like a death on the property can't be changed, for example. Your state may not even require that these events be disclosed.


The Home Inspection Raised Some Concerns 


If the home inspection reveals some issues that the seller isn’t willing to fix, you have the right as a buyer to walk away. In many cases, these problems would be things like wiring or plumbing issues. 


The Property Appraised For Less Than The Offer


If the property appraises for less than what you offered for the home, you may feel quite upset as a buyer. Don’t worry! There are a few things that you can do. Lenders won’t give you more than what the property appraises for. You can, however, bring more of your own cash to the closing table. You can also wait for the seller to adjust the asking price, or withdraw your offer altogether. The problem with the last solution is that you may lose any earnest money deposits      





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Posted by Sharon Lanen Coskren on 1/26/2018

What Is The Disclosure Statement?


Disclosure statements are used in many of life’s situations. This is the place where the buyer is able to learn about the ins and outs of the property that they are about the buy. Examples of items that would be on a seller’s disclosure are:


  • Water in the basement
  • Updates made to the home
  • Known pests
  • Paranormal activity
  • Death on the property
  • Past fires
  • Nearby major construction projects
  • Title 5 sewerage issues 


Disclosures Serves As Protections


The disclosure statement serves as a protection for both the buyer and the seller. From a buyer’s perspective, through this information, they are able to understand a bit more about the property that they are potentially buying. 


On the seller’s side of things, the disclosure statement serves a s legal protection of sorts. The seller is obliged to reveal anything about the property that could potentially affect the value or affect the living conditions.


How Does The Seller Make The Disclosure


Each state and even each city within a state varies in the way a disclosure is conducted.  The statement can be composed of dozens of documents that need to be signed by the seller. Other states have disclosure document forms that consist of a series of yes or no questions about the home. Sellers may also be required o present communications between neighbors, owners, and agents. In some states, the disclosure statement is valid for up to 10 years, allowing buyers to collect damages if something wasn’t properly presented on the statement.  


How Do Sellers Know What To Disclose?


The basic rule of thumb is that if you know something about your property, you should disclose it. If you try to hide something, it could come back to meet you in the form of a lawsuit, even years later. Many states have legal requirements as to what should be revealed on these documents.  


What’s Disclosed To Buyers?


The disclosure doesn’t have to be all bad. This document is also an opportunity for sellers to present any of the improvements that they have made to the home. Make sure that you include all of the upgrades, renovations, and improvements that you have made to the home that you’re selling. This can help to impress buyers as to how well you have taken care of the property.


It’s easy as the buyer to check some of these improvements as you can find out if the work was done with or without permits by checking with the city’s zoning reports. Work that was done without a permit may have not been completed according to code. This could pose some serious health and safety risks to you and your family. 


Problems that you’ll want to disclose as a seller include pest problems, property line disputes, disturbances in the neighborhood, liens on the property, and appliance malfunctions. 


Remember that the disclosure doesn’t substitute the buyer’s right to a professional inspection of the property. It’s important for buyers to know as much about a property as they can in order to be sure they’re making a good investment.







Sharon Lanen Coskren