Sharon Lanen Coskren - Leading Edge Real Estate



Posted by Sharon Lanen Coskren on 6/29/2018

When you have kids, it’s difficult to keep a spotless home. Your home will undoubtedly be “lived in,” as the saying goes. There’s ways that you can keep nice things and make those things accident-proof and kid-proof at the same time. Kids can spill things, cause dirt build-up, and even sustain minor injuries from certain pieces of furniture. Slip Covers Work Wonders Slip covers are really amazing assets to any home with children. Most of these covers are washable. You can fit them tightly around your furniture for a smooth look. Guests won’t even know that you’re using slip covers! The bonus is that you’ll be able to keep your nicer furniture fresh and clean. Substitute The Coffee Table Instead of a coffee table, try an ottoman with a new purpose. Ottomans will help keep kids from hurting themselves on the sometimes sharp corners of the coffee table. It will also give you somewhere to prop your feet up after a long day. This tactic will save you from the grief of many bumped heads, since ottomans are soft. You can use your ottoman to place books and other items on and around. Showcase An Art Wall Dedicate a space for kids’ art. This will make for a colorful addition to your home and give the sense to guests that your home is indeed family friendly. It’s also just plain fun to showcase the art that your children create. It will give the kids a sense of pride and joy! Whether it’s a wall or a hallway, this idea is always perfect for a home with kids. When In Doubt, Buy Washable There are plenty of things that come in washable form from throw pillows to paint. Some sofas even come with removable, washable cushion covers. These will all be a blessing to you when cleaning up after your children. Incorporate Extra Storage With all of the extra toys around your home, you’ll need extra storage to keep them in. Think about using pretty storage pieces like baskets, which are easy for kids to manage and easy for you to store. While your home won’t need to be childproof forever, doing it now will save you from ruining expensive things. However, if there’s items that you really love, don’t sacrifice. Take the safety measures and precautions that you feel are necessary and don’t worry about the rest. A house is meant to be lived in. Remember that it’s not a museum!





Posted by Sharon Lanen Coskren on 2/16/2018

Home is the the most comfortable place to be. We relax after a long day of work in the living room, eat meals with our family in our kitchen, and sleep soundly in our beds at night. All of this comfort can sometimes cause us to overlook basic safety habits that keep us and our property safe. One of the chief threats to our safety at home is house fires. A great way to keep tabs on our fire preparedness is to have a yearly "fire safety week" with our families to teach and reinforce important information around fires. Read on to see the five-day plan that, for just a few minutes per day, has the potential to save lives.

Day 1: Smoke detectors

The most basic fire safety items that each home has are the smoke detectors. On day one take the kids around the house and show them where each smoke detector is. Have them block their ears and show them how to test the detectors. Change all of the batteries as well. Don't be conservative or frugal with batteries when it comes to smoke detectors; it's worth the extra few bucks to know that you can depend on them.

Day 2: Fire extinguishers

On the second day, bring the kids around the house again showing them the location of fire extinguishers and explaining their function. If there ever is a small house fire you don't want to fumbling around with an extinguisher trying to learn how to use it. Explain that these are not toys and can be dangerous. If your kids are old enough to be home alone, teach them how to use the extinguishers. If the kids are too young tell them to seek you out immediately if they see or smell smoke, or think there might be a fire. Read the pressure gauge on all of your fire extinguishers to make sure they're adequately pressurized. Replace fire extinguishers that are over twelve years old.

Day 3: Escape plan

Every house should have an evacuation plan in case of a fire. Each room should have two escape routes in case one is blocked off by fire or some other barrier. Have your children go through the evacuation routes for each of their rooms. Do this for yourself as well to ensure there are no problems with your plan. Then take the family outside to a meeting spot away from the house. Tell them that this is where each member of the family will meet in case of a fire.

Day 4: Fire hazards

The average house has unlimited potential for fire hazards. Curtains near heaters or ovens, candles too close to flammable objects, and even power outlets can all cause a house fire. Before today's lesson, go through your house and find potential fire hazards and teach your family how to correct these habits during today's lesson. If your kids are old enough to cook, run through various cooking fire hazards as well.

Day 5: Review

Today, review the previous four days' lessons with your family. You can also use today to cover the top eight causes of house fires according to the National Fire Protection Association:
  1. Candles
  2. Smoking
  3. Electrical and lighting
  4. Dryers and washing machines
  5. Lightning
  6. Children playing with fire (matches, lighters, etc.)
  7. Christmas trees
  8. Cooking







Sharon Lanen Coskren