Posted by Sharon Lanen Coskren on 6/22/2018

From the time an offer is made on a property, and the deal is done, you may face quite a few challenges. Whether you’re buying or selling a home, the process can be dizzying. There are a lot of things that go on from the time an offer is accepted, and the closing table is reached. The entire process of home buying and selling is designed with built-in protections to help both buyers and sellers avoid feeling a lot of regrets. Below, you’ll find some familiar situations in the buying and selling process, and what’s available to help you avoid disappointment.


Once An Offer Is Accepted, Is It Binding? 


If you were overzealous to accept an offer on the home you’re selling and wish you had looked at others before making a decision, you’re not out of luck. Once you’re under contract, you’re obligated to sell to a buyer. The reason you may want to look at other offers is that it doesn’t hurt to have a “backup” buyer. If something falls through with the first buyer, the second buyer in line becomes automatically under contract. While you may not necessarily sell for more, in this case, there’s a sure way available to help you sell your home fast. 


The Buyer Doesn’t Have The Financing They Thought They Did


If a buyer’s financial backing falls through or if the buyer is unable to get financing by the closing date, as a seller, you can walk away. Any financial changes to the contract that would impact you as a seller including a change in the type of loan, downpayment amount, or any variation from the contract terms allow the seller to end the contract unscathed. 


Something Wasn’t Disclosed About The Property


Not everything is required to be disclosed by a seller. It all depends upon the rules within the state where you are buying. Understand what’s required to be revealed. If you feel uncomfortable with something, you can inquire about it, or add a contingency to have the problem addressed. Things like a death on the property can't be changed, for example. Your state may not even require that these events be disclosed.


The Home Inspection Raised Some Concerns 


If the home inspection reveals some issues that the seller isn’t willing to fix, you have the right as a buyer to walk away. In many cases, these problems would be things like wiring or plumbing issues. 


The Property Appraised For Less Than The Offer


If the property appraises for less than what you offered for the home, you may feel quite upset as a buyer. Don’t worry! There are a few things that you can do. Lenders won’t give you more than what the property appraises for. You can, however, bring more of your own cash to the closing table. You can also wait for the seller to adjust the asking price, or withdraw your offer altogether. The problem with the last solution is that you may lose any earnest money deposits      





Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Sharon Lanen Coskren on 6/15/2018

"Motivation" could be defined as a positive energy that is applied to the achievement of a desired goal.

You may be wondering whether you, as a home seller, need to be motivated. The short answer is: "Yes! Your attitude and energy level can potentially make a huge difference in the sale of your home!"

In rare instances, the right buyer may show up at just the right time, without much effort on your part. However, when it comes to getting the best price for your house and selling it within the shortest period of time, you don't want to leave things to chance! The stakes are too high and the window of opportunity is too brief to depend on luck. Although there are several variables that are beyond your control -- such as market conditions, location, and time of year -- there are plenty of things you can do to increase the probability of a fast sale.

Choose a proactive real estate agent: The encouraging news is that there are many full-time real estate agents who are personable, focused, and results oriented. They know their business and they recognize the value of positive client relationships. However, all real estate agents are not created equal. Unless you're hiring a real estate agent based on a rock-solid recommendation from a trusted friend or relative, it's always best to interview at least two agents before making your final decision.

The real estate agent you ultimately work with will have a direct impact on many aspects of your home-selling experience, so it pays to choose carefully. Although a good rapport does go a long way toward a successful working relationship with an agent, it's vital to find one who's experienced, knowledgeable, and successful. Success is important because if they don't have a proven record of selling houses in your area -- especially ones in your price range -- then how can you be sure they'll market your home effectively?

Always put your best foot forward: One crucial thing house sellers do have control over is making a good impression. You rarely get a second chance to make a great first impression, so it's well worth your while to prioritize things like curb appeal, cleanliness, and home staging.

If there's anything about the appearance or functionality of your home that concerns you, you can be sure prospective buyers are also going to notice it. An experienced real estate agent will have a good sense of effective home staging, what might put off buyers, and how you can cost-effectively remedy problems.

Half the battle usually involves thoroughly cleaning your house, applying a fresh coat of neutral-colored paint where needed, and getting rid of clutter in and around all surfaces, including floors, countertops, walls, and storage areas. Although every situation is different, when it comes to furniture arrangement and room décor, "less is (usually) more!"





Posted by Sharon Lanen Coskren on 6/9/2018

Enjoy serene tree lined views from the backyard of this lovely colonial on a quiet cul de sac. Spend summer days relaxing on your screened in porch enjoying all that nature has to offer. Lots of lawn plus deck for barbecues, games and summer activities. When it gets colder, light filled family room overlooks private backyard offering you a quiet retreat. Nice front to back living room and spacious eat in kitchen provide plenty of room for entertaining. Great mudroom/laundry combination on first floor makes it easy to get organized. Second floor has oversized master suite with window seats to relax and enjoy your morning coffee. There's also a sitting room and master bath plus three additional bedrooms. Bonus finished space in lower level is perfect for workouts, playroom and home office. All of this plus an easy commute to major highways, shopping and dining.

More Info on this Property | New Listing Alerts





Posted by Sharon Lanen Coskren on 6/8/2018

Making an offer on a home you’re hoping to buy is a stressful endeavor. You want your offer to stand apart from others, and if you don’t feel comfortable increasing the offer, a personalized letter is a good way to explain your situation and possibly sway the seller in your favor.

Sounds good, right? But when most of us sit down to write an effective offer letter we often come up stumped. What makes your situation different than any other hopeful buyer? How do you find the right tone in your letter? How do you sign off at the end? 

There are a number of things to consider when writing an offer letter. So, in this article, we’re going to help you craft an offer letter that will give you the best chance of getting accepted by a home seller.

 Begin with them

Before you start talking about yourself and why you love the house, start by addressing the seller by name. Thank them for letting you view their home, and compliment them on the work they’ve done to take care of it.

Why you love their home

A good place to start in your offer letter is to describe exactly what sets their home apart from the others you looked at. Are there defining characteristics of the home that make it perfectly suited to your family? Does it have a large yard that your dog will love to run in or the workshop you’ve always wanted to practice your woodworking?
Make your letter personal. This is your chance to show that you aren’t just concerned with the price of the home.

Share information wisely

Some buyers get excited about all of the changes they would make if their offer was accepted on a home. And while it’s okay to plan and be excited for the future, you might not want to share that information with the seller.

Remember that they have many memories and hours of work put into their home, and they might not appreciate you talking about how you’re going to start tearing down walls.

Be concise

Once you get into the flow of writing your letter, it’s easy to get carried away. However, sellers will be more receptive to reading and understanding your letter if it is short and to the point. Try not to go over a page, single-spaced.

Once you’ve written your letter, review it to see if there’s anything that can be simplified or removed altogether.

Peer review

Before sending your letter, have a family member, friend, or real estate agent look it over. Not only will they be able to catch small grammatical errors, but they’ll also let you know if something you’ve written is confusing or would be considered over-sharing.

Presentation

You might be tempted to hit the send button as soon as you’re done with your letter. However, receiving an email can be impersonal--we all get hundreds of emails that we never even open. Rather, print your letter on nice paper, sign it by hand, and consider attaching a family photo if you have one that’s suitable.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Sharon Lanen Coskren on 6/1/2018

There's no question about it: Aging can be a mixed blessing -- especially if you're not prepared for it! Although aging does bring with it some advantages -- the most notable one being wisdom -- a certain amount of physical decline is inevitable.

Staying active and leading a healthy lifestyle are two ways to slow down the aging process, but there's another key element many people overlook when planning for their retirement years: eliminating tripping and slipping hazards in the home. Whether you're concerned about your own wellbeing or that of aging parents, here are several steps you can take to reduce the risk of injury from accidental falls.

  • Install or secure stair railings: While most homes are equipped with stair railings, they may eventually become loose, wobbly, or even detached. Making sure that all stairways have easy-to-reach, securely fastened railings can make life at home safer for everyone.
  • Stair safety tips: Slippery stairs (indoors and out) may need to have adhesive safety strips applied to them to help improve traction. If freezing temperatures are ever an issue for you, it's always helpful to have a small, easy to lift bag of rock salt on hand to melt icy walkways and stairs. Even though you may live in a warmer part of the country, temperatures do occasionally plummet to 32 degrees and below, so no one is immune to cold snaps and occasional freezing conditions in winter --even Floridians! Here's one cautionary tip that relates to basement stairs: For some reason, perhaps because of inadequate lighting, people (of all ages) sometimes take a tumble when they don't see the bottom stair. If this ever happens in your home, you may need to either make the lighting brighter and/or apply bright tape or paint to the bottom stair to make it more visible.
  • Reduce slipping hazards in bathrooms: Bathtub and shower floor surfaces can get pretty slippery when soap, shampoo, and water are added, so the use of non-slip rubber mats or safety appliques can help prevent potentially dangerous falls. Installing grab bars in showers and bathtub areas can make life easier and safer for aging residents or visitors in your home, too.
  • Remove clutter from floors and stairs: This objective can be more challenging when you have children who leave toys, books, balls, clothes, spilled liquids, food, and other miscellaneous things on the floor. However, when you have seniors trying to safely navigate their way around the house, keeping clutter and spills to a bare minimum is essential. That also holds true for minimizing tripping risks from cable wires, extension cords, and throw rugs.

If you're considering remodeling all or part of your home to accommodate either your needs or those of aging relatives, many experienced contractors and remodelers are well versed in products and strategies for making a home more senior friendly or handicapped accessible.